APA Citation

Chauncy, C. (1770). Trust in God, the duty of a people in a day of trouble: A sermon preached May 30th, 1770, at the request of a great number of gentlemen, friends to the liberties of North-America, who were desirous, notwithstanding the removal of the Massachusetts General-Court (unconstitutionally as they judged) to Cambridge, that God might be acknowledged in that house of worship at Boston, in which our tribes, from the days of our fathers, have annually sought to him for direction, previous to the choice of his Majesty's Council. Boston: Printed by Daniel Kneeland for Thomas Leverett.

Chicago Style Citation

Chauncy, Charles. Trust in God, the Duty of a People in a Day of Trouble: A Sermon Preached May 30th, 1770, At the Request of a Great Number of Gentlemen, Friends to the Liberties of North-America, Who Were Desirous, Notwithstanding the Removal of the Massachusetts General-Court (unconstitutionally As They Judged) to Cambridge, That God Might Be Acknowledged in That House of Worship At Boston, in Which Our Tribes, From the Days of Our Fathers, Have Annually Sought to Him for Direction, Previous to the Choice of His Majesty's Council. Boston: Printed by Daniel Kneeland for Thomas Leverett, 1770.

MLA Citation

Chauncy, Charles. Trust in God, the Duty of a People in a Day of Trouble: A Sermon Preached May 30th, 1770, At the Request of a Great Number of Gentlemen, Friends to the Liberties of North-America, Who Were Desirous, Notwithstanding the Removal of the Massachusetts General-Court (unconstitutionally As They Judged) to Cambridge, That God Might Be Acknowledged in That House of Worship At Boston, in Which Our Tribes, From the Days of Our Fathers, Have Annually Sought to Him for Direction, Previous to the Choice of His Majesty's Council. Boston: Printed by Daniel Kneeland for Thomas Leverett, 1770.

Warning: These citations may not always be 100% accurate.