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Social and behavioral research and the internet : advances in applied methods and research strategies /

Other Authors: Das, Marcel., Ester, P., Kaczmirek, Lars.
Format: Book
Language: English
Published: New York : Routledge, 2011
Series: European Association of Methodology series.
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Table of Contents:
  • Machine generated contents note:
  • ch. 1
  • Introduction /
  • Lars Kaczmirek
  • References
  • pt. I
  • Methodology in Internet Survey Research
  • ch. 2
  • Internet Survey Methods: A Review of Strengths, Weaknesses, and Innovations /
  • Jennie E. Pearson
  • 2.1.
  • Introduction
  • 2.2.
  • Brief History of Internet Surveys
  • 2.3.
  • Strengths and Weaknesses of Internet Surveys
  • 2.4.
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • ch. 3
  • Internet Surveys as Part of a Mixed-Mode Design /
  • Joop J. Hox
  • 3.1.
  • Introduction
  • 3.2.
  • Available Data Collection Methods
  • 3.3.
  • Review of Empirical Evidence of Mode Equivalence
  • 3.4.
  • Consequences of Mixed-Mode Design for Questionnaire Development
  • 3.5.
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • ch. 4
  • "True" Longitudinal and Probability-Based Internet Panels: Evidence From the Netherlands /
  • Marcel Das
  • 4.1.
  • Introduction
  • 4.2.
  • Longitudinal Panel Surveys
  • 4.3.
  • New Developments in Survey Research
  • 4.4.
  • LISS Panel
  • 4.5.
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • ch. 5
  • How Representative Are Online Panels? Problems of Coverage and Selection and Possible Solutions /
  • Jelke G. Bethlehem
  • 5.1.
  • Introduction
  • 5.2.
  • Problems in Online Panels
  • 5.3.
  • Can We Correct the Bias? Weighting Adjustment
  • 5.4.
  • Better Online Panel?
  • 5.5.
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • ch. 6
  • Ethical Considerations in Internet Surveys /
  • Mick P. Couper
  • 6.1.
  • Introduction
  • 6.2.
  • Basic Ethical Principles: Confidentiality and Informed Consent
  • 6.3.
  • Obtaining Consent for the Collection of Paradata: Report of an Experiment
  • 6.4.
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • pt. II
  • Advanced Methods and Applications
  • ch. 7
  • How Visual Design Affects the Interpretability of Survey Questions /
  • Don A. Dillman
  • 7.1.
  • Introduction
  • 7.2.
  • How Visual Information Is Processed
  • 7.3.
  • Research on How Visual Layout Influences Answers
  • 7.4.
  • Needed Research on Which Visual Layout Considerations Are Most Important
  • 7.5.
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • ch. 8
  • Attention and Usability in Internet Surveys: Effects of Visual Feedback in Grid Questions /
  • Lars Kaczmirek
  • 8.1.
  • Introduction
  • 8.2.
  • Background
  • 8.3.
  • Hypotheses, Design, and Implementation
  • 8.4.
  • Results
  • 8.5.
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • ch. 9
  • Using Interactive Features to Motivate and Probe Responses to Open-Ended Questions /
  • Leah Melani Christian
  • 9.1.
  • Introduction
  • 9.2.
  • Theoretical Background and Hypotheses
  • 9.3.
  • Methods
  • 9.4.
  • Results
  • 9.5.
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • ch. 10
  • Measuring Attitudes Toward Controversial Issues in Internet Surveys: Order Effects of Open and Closed Questioning /
  • Henk Vinken
  • 10.1.
  • Introduction
  • 10.2.
  • Background
  • 10.3.
  • Design and Implementation
  • 10.4.
  • Results
  • 10.5.
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • pt. III
  • Data Quality: Problems and Solutions
  • ch. 11
  • Challenges in Reaching Hard-to-Reach Groups in Internet Panel Research /
  • Miquelle A.G. Marchand
  • 11.1.
  • Introduction
  • 11.2.
  • Hard-to-Reach Groups in Internet Panel Research
  • 11.3.
  • Hard-to-Reach Groups and the Recruitment of the LISS Panel
  • 11.4.
  • Hard-to-Reach Groups Participating in the LISS Panel
  • 11.5.
  • Response Rates in the LISS Panel
  • 11.6.
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • ch. 12
  • Mode and Context Effects in Measuring Household Assets /
  • Arie Kapteyn
  • 12.1.
  • Introduction
  • 12.2.
  • HRS Internet Experiment
  • 12.3.
  • Asset Ownership
  • 12.4.
  • Amounts Held
  • 12.5.
  • Regression Models for Ownership and Amounts Held
  • 12.6.
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • ch. 13
  • Internet Survey Paradata /
  • Dirk Heerwegh
  • 13.1.
  • Introduction
  • 13.2.
  • Types of Internet Survey Paradata
  • 13.3.
  • Potential Uses of Internet Survey Paradata
  • 13.4.
  • Collecting Internet Survey Paradata
  • 13.5.
  • Data Preparation and Analysis
  • 13.6.
  • Example Study: Use of Paradata to Assist in the Development of Theory
  • 13.7.
  • Conclusions
  • Disclaimer
  • References
  • ch. 14
  • Use of Eye Tracking for Studying Survey Response Processes /
  • Ting Yan
  • 14.1.
  • Introduction
  • 14.2.
  • What Is Eye Tracking?
  • 14.3.
  • What Can Eye Tracking Do?
  • 14.4.
  • What Can Eye Tracking Do That the Other Methods Cannot?
  • 14.5.
  • What Has Been Done With Eye Tracking?
  • 14.6.
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • ch. 15
  • Can Biomarkers Be Collected in an Internet Survey? A Pilot Study in the LISS Panel /
  • Johan P. Mackenbach
  • 15.1.
  • Introduction
  • 15.2.
  • Rationale for the Collection of Biomarker Data
  • 15.3.
  • LISS Panel Biomarket Pilot
  • 15.4.
  • Results
  • 15.5.
  • Conclusions
  • References
  • ch. 16
  • Discussion and Conclusions /
  • Lars Kaczmirek.