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A history of psycholinguistics : the pre-Chomskyan era /

Main Author: Levelt, W. J. M. 1938-
Format: Book
Language: English
Published: Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2013
Edition: 1st ed.
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Table of Contents:
  • Note continued: The Wemicke-Lichtheim model
  • Diagram makers and making diagrams
  • Adolf Kussmaul's textbook
  • One more diagram maker: Jean-Martin Charcot
  • Some non-localizationist sounds
  • Retrospect
  • 4.Language acquisition and the diary explosion
  • Perspectives on language acquisition
  • Early scholars of language acquisition
  • Jean Heroard
  • Dietrich Tiedemann and Moritz von Winterfeld
  • Berthold Sigismund
  • Hippolyte Taine and Charles Darwin
  • Jan Baudouin de Courtenay
  • Bernard Perez
  • Fritz Schultze
  • Ludwig Strumpell
  • William Preyer
  • George Romanes
  • Gabriel Compayre and Gabriel Deville
  • Frederick Tracy
  • James Sully
  • Kathleen Carter Moore
  • Wilhelm Ament
  • The community of child language researchers
  • Issues and controversies in child language
  • Origins of child language
  • Sound development
  • Inner speech development
  • Ontogenesis recapitulating phylogenesis
  • Gestures and gesture languages
  • Note continued: Charles-Michel de l'Epee and Joseph-Marie Degirando
  • The demise of Deaf sign language
  • Retrospect
  • 5.Language in the laboratory and modeling microgenesis
  • Mental chronometry: Franciscus Donders
  • Phonetics and Wolfgang von Kempelen's speaking machine
  • Reading and naming
  • Hubert von Grashey
  • James McKeen Cattell
  • Benno Erdmann and Raymond Dodge
  • Walter Pillsbury and Oscar Quanz
  • Edmund Huey
  • Speech perception and William Bagley
  • Verbal learning, memory, and habits
  • Hermann Ebbinghaus
  • Benjamin Bourdon
  • Association and analogy
  • Francis Galton
  • Martin Trautscholdt
  • James McKeen Cattell
  • Joseph Jastrow and Gustav Aschaffenburg
  • Albert Thumb and Karl Marbe
  • Speech errors
  • Rudolf Meringer and Carl Mayer
  • Heath Bawden
  • Retrospect
  • 6.Wilhelm Wundt's grand synthesis
  • A productive life
  • Wundt's psychology
  • Experimental and ethnic psychology
  • Association and apperception
  • Voluntarism
  • Note continued: Expressive movements
  • Sign language
  • Types of sign language
  • Pointing, imitating, and abstract signs
  • Grammatical categories and sign syntax
  • No match to spoken languages, but a window on the origins of language
  • Speech sounds
  • Evolution of vocal expression
  • Children's acquisition of sound patterns
  • Natural sounds
  • Folk psychology of sound change
  • Three types of sound change in the individual and in the language community
  • Contact effects: assimilation and dissimilation
  • Distance effects: analogy
  • Regular sound change: Grimm's laws
  • Words
  • Word formation in brain and mind
  • Parts of speech
  • Meaning change
  • Formulating sentences
  • Where do sentences come from?
  • Varieties of syntax and phrase structure
  • Sentence prosody
  • Outer and internal speech form
  • The origins of language
  • Wundt's psycholinguistic legacy
  • Epilogue: turning the century
  • Note continued: pt. 3 Twentieth-century psycholinguistics before the "cognitive revolution"
  • 7.New perspectives: Structuralism and the psychology of imageless thought
  • Emerging structuralism: Taine, Baudouin de Courtenay, and Saussure
  • Structuralism and the psychology of language: Sechehaye
  • Parisian structuralism and Henri Delacroix
  • The psychology of imageless thought: the Wurzburg school
  • The Buhler-Wundt clash
  • Otto Selz and Charlotte Buhler on sentence formulation
  • Otto Selz
  • Charlotte Buhler
  • Retrospect
  • 8.Verbal behavior
  • Heterogeneous behaviorism
  • Watson and vocalic thought
  • Speech for social control: Grace de Laguna and John Markey
  • From Stumpf to Bloomfield
  • Max Meyer
  • Albert Paul Weiss
  • Leonard Bloomfield
  • Bloomfield's behaviorist heritage: Zellig Harris and Noam Chomsky
  • Kantor's psycholinguistics
  • Burrhus Frederic Skinner
  • Mediation theory
  • Semantic conditioning
  • Cofer and Foley's analysis
  • Note continued: Charles Osgood's theory and measurement of meaning
  • Hobart Mowrer: the sentence as conditioning device
  • Retrospect
  • 9.Speech acts and functions
  • Philip Wegener and Adolf Reinach, the pioneers
  • Alan Gardiner: the functions of word and sentence
  • Karl Buhler
  • From Wurzburg to Vienna
  • The functions of language
  • The Organon Model
  • The two-field theory of reference
  • The deictic field
  • The symbol field: a two-class system
  • The principle of abstractive reference
  • Lexicon
  • Syntax
  • Composition
  • Case structure
  • The sound stream
  • Buhler's axioms
  • Buhler and the Prague school
  • Functions and speech acts in retrospect
  • 10.Language acquisition: Wealth of data, dearth of theory
  • Clara and William Stern
  • Leading twentieth-century scholars and research teams before the "cognitive revolution"
  • Michael Vincent O'Shea
  • Ivan Gheorgov and studies of self-reference
  • Jules Ronjat and Milivoie Pavlovitch
  • Note continued: Scandinavian diary studies: Otto Jespersen
  • Jacques van Ginneken
  • Emit Froschels
  • Jean Piaget
  • Lev Semenovich Vygotsky
  • Elemer Kenyeres
  • David and Rosa Katz
  • Yosikazu Ohwaki
  • Ovide Decroly
  • The Institutes of Child Welfare
  • Michael Morris Lewis and his sources
  • Antoine Gregoire
  • Roman Jakobson
  • Aleksandr Gvozdev and Werner Leopold
  • The growth of vocabulary and utterance complexity
  • Studies in speech sound development
  • From first cries to words: Lewis, Buhler, and Hetzer
  • Physiology, environment, and heredity in early sound formation: Gregoire and van Ginneken
  • Sound assimilation and children's early words: Rottger's dissertation
  • Jakobson on universals of phonological development
  • The Child Welfare Institutes on early sound development
  • Sound development in Gvozdev's and Leopold's diaries
  • Language acquisition in bilingual environments
  • Retrospect: data, theory, and method
  • Note continued: 11.Language in the brain: The lures of holism
  • Joseph Jules Dejerine
  • Pierre Marie
  • Pierre Marie's "deconstruction"
  • The aphasia debate
  • The aftermath
  • A German response: Hugo Liepmann
  • The continuing German tradition
  • Carl Wernicke
  • Wernicke's assistants
  • Constantin von Monakow
  • A psychological approach to agrammatism: Arnold Pick
  • Responses to Pick
  • Karl Kleist
  • Max Isserlin's adaptation theory
  • Henry Head: a holist's view on theory in aphasiology
  • Words as units of speech
  • Centers and their lesions
  • Adaptation
  • Aphasic syndromes
  • Localization
  • Methodology
  • Kurt Goldstein and the single case study
  • Holism and the organismic approach
  • General effects of brain damage
  • Instrumentalities and abstract language
  • Inner speech
  • Language functions
  • Forms of language disturbance
  • Localization
  • Epilogue
  • Roman Jakobson
  • Theodore Weisenburg and Katherine McBride: aphasia is diverse
  • Note continued: Other American contributions
  • Alexander Romanovich Luria
  • The systems approach
  • Data base
  • The structure of speech activity
  • Phonemic analysis
  • Temporal lobe systems
  • Frontal systems
  • Parieto-occipital systems
  • Retrospect
  • 12.Empirical studies of speech and language usage
  • Perception and production of speech and language
  • Perceiving consonants and vowels
  • Harvey Fletcher's approach to intelligibility
  • Perceiving words: noise and number of alternatives
  • Skinner's "verbal summator" and response bias
  • Speech errors
  • Articulation
  • Delayed speech
  • Meaning
  • Associations
  • Scaling
  • Meaningfulness
  • Content analysis
  • Phonetic symbolism
  • Metaphor and physiognomy
  • Verbal learning and memory: orders of approximation
  • The statistical approach
  • The rank-frequency distribution
  • The number-of-words-frequency distribution: Zipfs law
  • Zipfs law in associations
  • Diversity of words in language usage
  • Note continued: Yule on the statistics of style
  • Word frequency and recognition threshold
  • Word frequency and word association
  • Transitional probabilities
  • Individual differences
  • Linguistic abilities
  • Projective-clinical
  • Personality
  • Reading
  • Edmund Huey's text
  • Tachistoscopic studies
  • Eye-tracking studies
  • The Stroop paradigm
  • Retrospect
  • 13.A new cross-linguistic perspective and linguistic relativity
  • Verticalism
  • Horizontalism
  • Arthur Hocart
  • Franz Boas
  • Edward Sapir and linguistic relativism
  • The world view approach and linguistic relativism
  • Johann Leo Weisgerber
  • Benjamin Whorf, self-taught linguist
  • Whorf's "horizontalism"
  • Whorf on linguistic relativism
  • Whorf's universalism
  • Whorf and the public interest
  • Clear language
  • Lady Welby-Gregory
  • Dutch Significa
  • General Semantics
  • George Orwell
  • Some Soviet thoughts
  • Studies of relativity after Sapir-Whorf
  • Note continued: The 1953 Conference on Language in Culture
  • The codability experiments: Eric Lenneberg and Roger Brown
  • The coding of facial expressions
  • Grammatical categories and cognition
  • Retrospect: John Carroll's verdict
  • 14.Psychology of language during the Third Reich
  • Language, race, and world view
  • The 1931 Hamburg Congress of the German Psychological Society
  • The 1933 Leipzig Congress of the German Psychological Society
  • The 1933 "restoration" of the universities
  • William and Clara Stern
  • Ernst Cassirer
  • Heinz Werner
  • Kurt Goldstein and Adhemar Gelb
  • Wolfgang Kohler
  • David and Rosa Katz
  • Max Isserlin
  • Otto Selz
  • 1933-1938: some further developments
  • The Austrian Anschlu B
  • The fate of the Buhlers
  • Frieda Eisler
  • Emil Froschels
  • Roman Jakobson
  • Nikolaj Trubetskoy
  • German neurologists in war time
  • Friedrich Kainz
  • Retrospect
  • pt. 4 Psycholinguistics re-established
  • Note continued: 15.Psycholinguistics post-war, pre-Chomsky
  • The 1950 Conference on Speech Communication
  • The British scene
  • Some further developments in the study of the brain and language
  • Soviet Union
  • Germany
  • United Kingdom
  • United States
  • France and Belgium
  • Italy
  • Canada: Wilder Penfield and electrical brain stimulation
  • Geza Revesz and the Amsterdam symposium on thinking and speaking
  • Old and new in developmental psycholinguistics
  • Second-language learning and bilingualism
  • Experimental studies of language acquisition
  • The state of general psycholinguistics since 1951.