The implicit mind : cognitive architecture, the self, and ethics /
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The implicit mind : cognitive architecture, the self, and ethics /

Heroes are often admired for their ability to act without having "one thought too many," as Bernard Williams put it. Likewise, the unhesitating decisions of masterful athletes and artists are part of their fascination. Examples like these make clear that spontaneity can represent an ideal....

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Bibliographic Details
Main Author: Brownstein, Michael (Michael S.) (Author)
Corporate Author: Oxford Scholarship Online
Format: Online Book
Language:English
Published: New York, NY, United States of America : Oxford University Press, [2018]
Subjects:
Access:Online version
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050 4 |a BF323.S8  |b B76 2018 
049 |a PVUM 
100 1 |a Brownstein, Michael  |q (Michael S.),  |e author. 
245 1 4 |a The implicit mind :  |b cognitive architecture, the self, and ethics /  |c Michael Brownstein. 
264 1 |a New York, NY, United States of America :  |b Oxford University Press,  |c [2018] 
300 |a 1 online resource 
336 |a text  |b txt  |2 rdacontent 
337 |a computer  |b c  |2 rdamedia 
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505 0 |a 1. Introduction; Part ONE Mind; 2. Perception, Emotion, Behavior, and Change: Components of Spontaneous Inclinations; 3. Implicit Attitudes and the Architecture of the Mind; Part TWO Self; 4. Caring, Implicit Attitudes, and the Self; 5. Reflection, Responsibility, and Fractured Selves; Part THREE Ethics; 6. Deliberation and Spontaneity; 7. The Habit Stance; 8. Conclusion; Appendix: Measures, Methods, and Psychological Science; References; Index. 
506 |a Electronic access restricted to Villanova University patrons. 
520 |a Heroes are often admired for their ability to act without having "one thought too many," as Bernard Williams put it. Likewise, the unhesitating decisions of masterful athletes and artists are part of their fascination. Examples like these make clear that spontaneity can represent an ideal. However, recent literature in empirical psychology has shown how vulnerable our spontaneous inclinations can be to bias, shortsightedness, and irrationality. How can we make sense of these different roles that spontaneity plays in our lives? The central contention of this book is that understanding these two faces of spontaneity--its virtues and vices--requires understanding the "implicit mind." In turn, understanding the implicit mind requires considering three sets of questions. The first set focuses on the architecture of the implicit mind itself. What kinds of mental states make up the implicit mind? Are both "virtue" and "vice" cases of spontaneity products of one and the same mental system? What kind of cognitive structure do these states have, if so? The second set of questions focuses on the relationship between the implicit mind and the self. How should we relate to our spontaneous inclinations and dispositions? Are they "ours," in the sense that they reflect on our character or identity? Are we responsible for them? The third set focuses on the ethics of spontaneity. What can research on self-regulation teach us about how to improve the ethics of our implicit mind? How can we enjoy the virtues of spontaneity without succumbing to its vices? 
504 |a Includes bibliographical references and index. 
588 0 |a Online resource; title from digital title page (viewed on January 10, 2019). 
650 0 |a Subliminal perception. 
650 0 |a Self-consciousness (Awareness) 
650 0 |a Ethics. 
650 0 |a Intuition. 
650 0 |a Spontaneity (Personality trait) 
650 7 |a PSYCHOLOGY  |x Cognitive Psychology.  |2 bisacsh 
650 7 |a SCIENCE  |x Cognitive Science.  |2 bisacsh 
650 7 |a Ethics.  |2 fast  |0 (OCoLC)fst00915833 
650 7 |a Intuition.  |2 fast  |0 (OCoLC)fst00977856 
650 7 |a Self-consciousness (Awareness)  |2 fast  |0 (OCoLC)fst01732884 
650 7 |a Spontaneity (Personality trait)  |2 fast  |0 (OCoLC)fst01130364 
650 7 |a Subliminal perception.  |2 fast  |0 (OCoLC)fst01136599 
655 4 |a Electronic books. 
710 2 |a Oxford Scholarship Online. 
776 0 8 |i Print version:  |a Brownstein, Michael.  |t Implicit Mind : Cognitive Architecture, the Self, and Ethics.  |d Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2018 
856 4 0 |z Online version  |u http://ezproxy.villanova.edu/login?URL=https://www.oxfordscholarship.com/view/10.1093/oso/9780190633721.001.0001/oso-9780190633721 
994 |a 92  |b PVU 
852 0 |b WWW  |h BF323.S8  |i B76 2018