The landlord's pocket lawyer; or, The complete landlord and tenant Containing the whole law concerning landlords, tenants, and lodgers, explained in a familiar manner: more particularly, 1. The acts of Parliament and adjudged cases down to the year 1779, relative to distress; shewing in what cases a landlord may and may not distrain; and what things are distrainable, and what are not; together with the manner, &c. of making a distress. 2. Also the whole law concerning replevying of distresses; wherein ample instructions are given, which are equally essential to be known by both landlord and tenant. 3. Of leases, covenants, and conditions, provisoes and reserved rents, surrenders, and assignments of leases. 4. Forms of notices for quitting houses, lands, premises, or lodgings. 5. Memorandums, or agreements for letting houses, lands, premises or apartments. 6. Forms of leases, bills of sale, and other useful precedents, which are occasionally wanted in the transactions between landlords and tenants. 7. Of the several kinds of tenures or estates. 8. The law concerning ejectments. 9. Of recovering rents from lodgers, and the mose essectual method of turning them out of possession, &c. A work of the utmost utility to landlords and tenants, as it will enable each to be upon his guard against any impositions or mistakes committed by the other; and it cannot fail of being extremely useful to gentlemen of the law, farmers, stewards, agents, and to the majority of mankind; as there are very few individuals who may not with propriety be classed among landlords, tenants, or lodgers. By Walter Robinson, Esq. barrister at law.
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The landlord's pocket lawyer; or, The complete landlord and tenant Containing the whole law concerning landlords, tenants, and lodgers, explained in a familiar manner: more particularly, 1. The acts of Parliament and adjudged cases down to the year 1779, relative to distress; shewing in what cases a landlord may and may not distrain; and what things are distrainable, and what are not; together with the manner, &c. of making a distress. 2. Also the whole law concerning replevying of distresses; wherein ample instructions are given, which are equally essential to be known by both landlord and tenant. 3. Of leases, covenants, and conditions, provisoes and reserved rents, surrenders, and assignments of leases. 4. Forms of notices for quitting houses, lands, premises, or lodgings. 5. Memorandums, or agreements for letting houses, lands, premises or apartments. 6. Forms of leases, bills of sale, and other useful precedents, which are occasionally wanted in the transactions between landlords and tenants. 7. Of the several kinds of tenures or estates. 8. The law concerning ejectments. 9. Of recovering rents from lodgers, and the mose essectual method of turning them out of possession, &c. A work of the utmost utility to landlords and tenants, as it will enable each to be upon his guard against any impositions or mistakes committed by the other; and it cannot fail of being extremely useful to gentlemen of the law, farmers, stewards, agents, and to the majority of mankind; as there are very few individuals who may not with propriety be classed among landlords, tenants, or lodgers. By Walter Robinson, Esq. barrister at law.

Bibliographic Details
Main Author: Robinson, Walter
Corporate Author: Eighteenth Century Collections Online
Format: Book
Language:English
Published: London : Printed for S. Bladon, in Pater-noster Row, MDCCLXXX. [1780]
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Access:Online version
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