The 13th Amendment : how companies are turning prisons into cash cows.
Saved in:

The 13th Amendment : how companies are turning prisons into cash cows.

The 13th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution abolished slavery-but it still remains legal under one condition. The amendment reads: "Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States,...

Full description

Bibliographic Details
Corporate Author: Academic Video Online
Format: Online Video
Language:English
Published: [Place of publication not identified] : Big Think, 2018.
Subjects:
Access:Online version
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
Description
Summary:The 13th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution abolished slavery-but it still remains legal under one condition. The amendment reads: "Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction." Today in America, big corporations profit of cheap prison labor in both privatized and state-run prisons. Shaka Senghor knows this second wave of slavery well-he spent 19 years in jail, working for a starting wage of 17 cents per hour, in a prison where a 15-minute phone call costs between [dollar]3-[dollar]15. In this video, he shares the exploitation that goes on in American prisons, and how the 13th Amendment allows slavery to continue. He also questions the profit incentive to incarcerate in this country: why does America represent less than 5% of the world's population, but almost 25% of the world's prisoners? Shaka Senghor's latest venture is Mind Blown Media.
Item Description:Title from resource description page (viewed July 6, 2022).
Physical Description:1 online resource (4 minutes)
Playing Time:00:03:47
Access:Electronic access restricted to Villanova University patrons.