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The great Gatsby /

Main Author: Fitzgerald, F. Scott 1896-1940.
Other Authors: Bruccoli, Matthew Joseph, 1931-
Format: Book
Language: English
Published: Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1991
Series: Fitzgerald, F. Scott (Francis Scott), 1896-1940. Works. 1991.
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Review by Choice Review

This fine critical edition of The Great Gatsby is a desirable acquisition for all university libraries and will prove quite useful to both scholars and college students. Editor Bruccoli, a preeminent Fitzgerald scholar, has made numerous appropriate changes in the original text, many of them desired by Fitzgerald but overlooked in the haste with which the 1925 edition was rushed into print. The scholarly apparatus is accessible and often fascinating. Stages of composition and revision from manuscript through galleys are explained chronologically. Substantive emendations and typographical "accidentals" are catalogued. Explanatory notes are succinctly provided throughout the text. Various appendixes dealing with the novel's early titles, dust-jacket illustrations, chronology, and the geography of East and West Egg (with illustrative maps) are provided, as are facsimiles of sample manuscript and galley pages. Throughout, the editor explains and justifies the difficult decisions he has made as to what to change and what to let stand. In sum, this is a meticulous and necessary work of scholarship, a valuable addition to Fitzgerald studies and to any library.-B. H. Leeds, Central Connecticut State University

Copyright American Library Association, used with permission.
Review by Publisher's Weekly Review

Robertson Dean's rich, deep voice sweeps us into this classic with the same straightforward narrative elegance Fitzgerald gives his narrator, Nick Carraway. Dean manages to be moving without dramatic exaggeration, and to distinguish characters, male and female, without resort to stereotyping. He reifies Jay Gatsby in all his ambition and naivete, and paints Fitzgerald's complex picture of love, power, money, and hypocrisy with simple sonority. This audio is a wonderful experience for old fans as well as first-time Fitzgerald readers, and it comes with a companion e-book. (Dec.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Review by Library Journal Review

Canadian actor William Hope reads Naxos AudioBooks' first unabridged production of Fitzgerald's classic novel of the Roaring Twenties. It is a book that deserves a perfect reading, and though numerous other narrators have tried-among them Robertson Dean, Anthony Heald, Alexander Scourby, and Tim Robbins-Hope may have come closest to achieving this perfection. He stumbles a bit at the beginning, drawing upon the revelation that narrator Nick Carraway is a Yale man by making the narration somewhat arch, but once he settles down, Hope ably conveys Carraway's optimistic innocence. He also does quite well with the party guests and the gambler Meyer Wolfsheim, faltering only by making Tom Buchanan sound a bit like a gravel-voiced truck driver. Recommended for absolutely everyone, as even those familiar with the novel may notice something new thanks to Hope's nuanced (and only mildly faulty) performance. [Gatz, a live ensemble reading of this classic novel, is currently playing to great reviews.-Ed.]-Michael Adams, CUNY Graduate Ctr. Lib. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Review by School Library Journal Review

Gr 8 Up‘An initial biographical essay and closing chronology introduce Fitzgerald, his era, and his place in American literature. "For Further Research" includes Web site sources and provides helpful primary and secondary references. Spanning more than 50 years of criticism, the 19 pithy essays, one by Fitzgerald himself, are divided into three chapters that successively focus on Gatsby's character, American culture, and literary structure. Additional quotes, boxed and placed throughout the text, provide additional support for the authors' positions. There is little overlap of other Fitzgerald or Gatsby volumes in similar series, and although comparable titles written by one author exist, this volume's multi-authored critiques afford a highly varied, even conflicting, dialogue that's necessary for stimulating classroom discussion.‘Kate Foldy, Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Review by Horn Book Review

This thoughtful, well-developed, highly academic volume includes some background information about Fitzgerald, then presents a chapter-by-chapter summary of his novel. Eleven brief essays and snippets from longer critical works follow, exposing readers to a variety of scholarly perspectives and approaches. An annotated bibliography will be useful to young Fitzgerald scholars. Bib., ind. (c) Copyright 2010. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted. All rights reserved.

(c) Copyright 2010. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.