Saved in:
Preview

Broadway stories : a backstage journey through musical theatre /

Main Author: Bell, Marty.
Format: Book
Language: English
Published: New York, NY : Broadway Cares/Equity Fights Aids : 1993
Edition: 1st Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS ed.
Subjects:
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
Review by Choice Review

Building on his extensive show-business experience, Bell presents an enjoyable, instructive account of the making of Broadway musicals. His approach is novel: Each chapter is a case study (based on interviews) of a person involved in one of 16 different shows. Among those included are Margo Lion, producer of Jelly's Last Jam; Jerry Zaks, director of the revival of Guys and Dolls; Susan Stroman, choreographer of Crazy for You; Peter Stone, production doctor for Grand Hotel; and Kay McClelland, understudy in Nick and Nora. The resulting mosaic gives the reader not only an in-depth view of these collaborative enterprises but also an overview of the state of the American musical theater in the early 1990s. This work supplements, in a very human way, the more scholarly discussion in Bernard Rosenberg and Ernest Harburg's The Broadway Musical: Collaboration in Commerce and Art (CH, Apr'94). A section of photos shows the persons included. Essential for all performing arts collections and large academic libraries, this will also be a popular addition to public libraries and a helpful supplemental work in college libraries. R. D. Johnson; SUNY College at Oneonta

Copyright American Library Association, used with permission.
Review by Library Journal Review

This treasure trove presents focused narratives by men and women (one as young as 12 years old) who have made the Broadway musical theater their home. Sixteen chapters chronicle the hits and misses inherent to the musical stage, recounted by an actor or member of the creative team. With his ``fly-on-the-wall'' perspective, author Bell clearly captures the thespians' love for their work and respect for the musical theater tradition. Not a retrospective, this volume discusses musicals from the recent past (distinguishing this volume from the recent Sing Out Louise! , LJ 9/1/93). It is particularly nice that each chapter stands alone, making for great reading during times when interruptions are inevitable. Recommended for all theater collections, including those of school libraries.-- Diane H. Albosta, Episcopal H.S. Lib., Alexandria, Va. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.