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The timetables of Jewish history : a chronology of the most important people and events in Jewish history /

Main Author: Gribetz, Judah.
Other Authors: Greenstein, Edward L., Stein, Regina.
Format: Book
Language: English
Published: New York : Simon & Schuster, 1994
Edition: 1st Touchstone ed.
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Review by Choice Review

Gribetz's volume is a welcome addition to the already large collection of Judaic reference material. Although there is a large body of work in Judaica, there are very few chronologies with the scope of this volume, and none presenting Jewish history in the tabular format that Gribetz employs. Coverage is from 9000 BCE to December 1991. Depending on the specific historical period, there are three, four, or five columns with such headings as "General History," "Jewish History," "Jewish Culture," and "Jews in the Middle East," "Jews in Europe," and "Jews in North and South America." Span of dates depends on the historical period covered: during the fifth and sixth centuries, there are entries for every three to five years; for the Judaically fascinating 1940s, there are several entries for each month of the decade. Illustrations, photographs, tables, and charts are sprinkled throughout. An exceptionally complete index and rather minimal glossary complete the work. No other works compare with this volume. Several chronologies of Jewish history exist, but they detail only a short span of Jewish experience. For instance, Hershel Edelheit and Abraham Edelheit's A World in Turmoil: An Integrated Chronology (CH, Apr'92) does a good job of outlining important events concerning the Holocaust, but does so in a narrative form, for a limited span of years. Gribetz's work is an important and valuable resource and is strongly recommended for inclusion in academic and public libraries at all levels. T. Koppel; Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries

Copyright American Library Association, used with permission.
Review by Booklist Review

This latest addition to the Timetables series from Simon & Schuster covers Jewish history from the dawn of time through December 1991. For the years 9000 B.C. to A.D. 500, pages have three columns labeled "General History," "Jewish History," and "Jewish Culture." For the years 500 to 1492, there are four columns per page: "Jewish History" is divided into "Europe" and "Middle East/Africa." From 1492 to 1991, "Jewish History" adds a column for "North and South America." Early historical events are in increments of thousands of years, then hundreds, then tens. Modern history, beginning in 1933, is in increments of months. The "General History" column includes important events from all cultures, eastern and western, although it contains more western history (e.g., "1621--celebration of the first Thanksgiving. The three-day festival . . . is modeled on the biblical Festival of Sukkoth"). "Jewish History" gives details specific to the Jewish people (e.g., "May, 1949--A food rationing system is introduced in Israel; every citizen is allowed about 2,500 calories of food value every day"). "Jewish Culture" analyses literature, including the Bible and Talmud, art, music, and aspects of daily Jewish life (e.g., "260-- Following an ancient tradition of translating laws, Jews of Alexandria, Egypt, render the Torah in Greek"). Throughout the book, names of non-Jews are followed by an asterisk. A few black-and-white photographs and maps add interest to this book. Two dozen tables provide such statistics as "American Immigrants to Israel, 1950-1991" and "Germany's Jews in Modern Times." A glossary defines several hundred words, and a very detailed index of more than 60 pages refers back to pages and specific columns in the chronology. The compilers are Gribetz, a Jewish community leader; Edward L. Greenstein, a professor at the Jewish Theological Seminary of America; and Regina S. Stein, who teaches Jewish history. The fascinating information contained in this volume is arranged in an attractive and useful format. Its reasonable price makes it a high-priority purchase in any library where the subject is of interest. (Reviewed Sept. 1, 1993)

From Booklist, Copyright (c) American Library Association. Used with permission.
Review by Library Journal Review

Covering a span of time from prehistory through 1991, the data in this compendium are arranged in tabular form under the headings of General History, Jewish History, and Jewish Culture--with later headings dividing Jewish history into geographic areas. The biblical period is covered in fewer than 20 pages, and almost half the book is devoted to the 20th century. There is no articulated criteria for inclusion of material, and the choices in every category seem rather eclectic. Also, there is no clear demarcation among the categories, so that, for instance, obscure literary publications are frequently cited in the history columns. It is hard to tell what use can be made of this compilation other than as a resource for playing Jewish trivia.-- Carol R. Glatt, VA Medical Ctr. Lib., Philadelphia (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.