Review by Choice Review

These two large volumes include clear black-and-white photographic facsimiles of Mary Shelley's drafts and fair copies of her most famous novel, along with a meticulous type facsimile, a diplomatic text of the novel's first edition of 1818, extensive footnotes on the manuscripts, an introduction on the genesis of the work, and a long and detailed chronology of its composition and publication. The result is a complete collection of materials for studying the development of one of the most famous novels of the Romantic period. The edition is well designed and presents a mass of confusing materials as clearly as possible: the photofacsimiles are on the versos, and the type facsimile, 1818 text, and footnotes share the rectos, making for easy comparison. Robinson uses different typefaces to distinguish Mary Shelley's work from her husband's, a subject on which he writes with more authority than any previous commentator, and he devotes much of his commentary to settling the vexing question of Percy Bysshe Shelley's contributions to the novel. Essential for graduate students and researchers, but probably too much for most undergraduate collections. J. T. Lynch University of Pennsylvania

Copyright American Library Association, used with permission.
Review by Library Journal Review

This two-volume set is a facsimile of Shelley's original manuscript, which is now housed in the Bodleian Library at Oxford. Leading Frankenstein scholar Charles Robinson re-creates the process by which the various drafts of the novel were assembled into the finished book familiar to most readers today. Though this monumental piece of scholarship is a bit on the pricey side, universities with hardcore Shelley studies will probably want to purchase it. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.