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Review by Choice Review

This first "Cambridge Companion" dedicated to a Roman writer, or indeed to a single ancient author (there is one on Greek tragedy), is, as Martindale (Univ. of Bristol, UK) states, "designedly pluralist; a variety of approaches are demonstrated, [and] the contributors disagree among themselves on numerous issues." Thus, every reader is likely to find statements with which to disagree--but much also that is challenging, engaging, enlightening. The editor based the contents on the notion that "reception and interpretation are closely intertwined" and divides the contents into four parts: "Translation and Reception," "Genre and Poetic Career," "Contexts of Production," and "Contents and Forms." The four papers in part 3 are especially impressive; indeed, the essays by Tarrant, Zetzel, and Farrell are, in this reviewer's opinion, the strongest in the whole volume (in which 17 authors are represented). A 19-page bibliography and a serviceable index contribute to the usefulness of this admirable work, which will be frequently and profitably consulted by specialist and nonspecialist alike. W. W. de Grummond Florida State University

Copyright American Library Association, used with permission.