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Oliver Twist : authoritative text, backgrounds and sources, early reviews, criticism /

Main Author: Dickens, Charles, 1812-1870.
Other Authors: Kaplan, Fred, 1937-
Format: Book
Language: English
Published: New York : W.W. Norton, 1993
Edition: 1st ed., Norton critical ed.
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Review by Booklist Review

Dickens is a popular author among those reframing classic stories as graphic novels, and Oliver Twist has been adapted by a variety of American cartoonists in the past 50 years. In this French team's hands, however, we are treated to a much fuller version of Dickens' original, fully exploring the role of Oliver's half brother and the power play between Bill Sykes and Fagin. (The French edition, intended for children and students, appeared across five volumes, all of which are bound together in this Classics Illustrated Deluxe edition.) The full-color cartoon images show the literal warts of the bad guys, incorporate such Victorian idiomatic reflections of class as Fagin's pickle of a nose and Mr. Brownlow's lush facial hair, and the high energy of the numerous boys in the story. Variously sized panels shaped to facilitate the narrative flow communicate to the reader the states of mind of the characters. An excellent addition to any classics-adaptation shelf.--Goldsmith, Francisca Copyright 2010 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright (c) American Library Association. Used with permission.
Review by Publisher's Weekly Review

The inimitable Martin Jarvis brings his talents to bear on Charles Dickens's classic in an audiobook that will delight listeners with its superb recreations of gritty 19th-century London. To escape Mr. Bumble and life in the workhouse, Oliver flees to London where he meets the Artful Dodger and becomes embroiled with Fagin's ragtag band of thieves. Jarvis simply dazzles: his performance captures both the humor and sorrow of the text, his narration is crisp, and his characterizations-his rendition of the terrifying district magistrate, Mr. Fang, is particularly memorable-are as varied as they are energetic, befitting, and enjoyable. (June) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Review by Library Journal Review

This is one of Dickens's earliest and most famous novels, and there is no question of its importance to any literature collection. The adventures of orphan Oliver amidst a gang of pickpockets, and the indelible picture painted of the seamier side of London life, are an inextricable part of how we view Victorian England. But given the highly charged nature of Dickens's prose, and the huge cast of extraordinary characters who populate his world, the ability of a narrator to render this energetic novel with all the imagination and skill that it deserves becomes crucial in the decision of whether to purchase the program. Martin Jarvis, an accomplished British actor who is best known for his pivotal role in The Forsyte Saga, has devoted much of his time to audio recording, for which he has won a British Talkies Award. As this superb program demonstrates, Jarvis's high standing is well earned. Dickens himself, who performed his own work as often and as well as any writer of his day, would undoubtedly have applauded and so will any listener. Highly recommended.Peter Josyph, New York(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Review by School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-8-This graphic adaptation of the classic retains the excitement of Oliver's captures, escapes, rescues, and eventual salvation. Malam has kept some of Dickens's original dialogue, suitably explained in footnotes, so that the work does preserve some of its flavor. Each page features up to nine small illustrations in a fairly dim palette with browns and grays dominating. The panels feature captions underneath that tell the story along with dialogue and thought balloons, but speaking characters do not always have open mouths. The art is curiously static for a story filled with fleeing and fighting. The book opens with a page of characters that helps readers keep track of them. The work concludes with brief information on Dickens, some early criticism of the original story, notes on stage and screen productions, and a few pages on London's poor during Oliver's day that help to put the story into context. Will Eisner's Fagin the Jew (Doubleday, 2003) retells Oliver's story within Fagin's own and is for somewhat older audiences. Though not as appealing as one might hope for a graphic adaptation, Oliver is a suitable alternative for kids who want some visuals with their texts.-Eric Norton, McMillan Memorial Library, Wisconsin Rapids, WI (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Review by Horn Book Review

Although these retellings of classic stories provide the basic story lines, they have none of the elegance or charm of the originals. The language lacks vitality, and the very short format means that most of the details of the plot and character are lost. Readers would be better served by taking the time to read the originals. The three books include unremarkable illustrations. From HORN BOOK 1996, (c) Copyright 2010. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright 2010. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.