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Adventures of Huckleberry Finn /

Main Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910.
Format: Book
Language: English
Published: New York : Ivy Books : 1997
Edition: 1st Ballantine Books mass market ed.
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Review by Choice Review

One can find rivals to this renewed edition of the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, a remake and expansion of Iowa/California then-state-of-the-art 1988 edition (CH, May'89). They include The Annotated Huckleberry Finn, ed. by Michael Patrick Hearn (2001), which ranges widely through the culture of the 1840-90 period, and Vic Doyno's even more comprehensive Huck Finn: The Complete Buffalo and Erie County Public Library Manuscript, a CD-ROM featuring the complete facsimile of the manuscript and a computer-searchable e-text, along with hundreds of pages of scholarly analysis by various hands. Still, the new California edition occupies a special class, with a variety of notes ("Mark Twain's Working Notes" are a detective piece in themselves); massive emendations and textual alterations; careful textual notes on the editors' final text choices; a fascinating 130-page introduction; and reproductions of the book's advertising displays. Since all this material is in plain English, a nonspecialist can actually read it and be interested. Like the two California editions of Roughing It (1972, 1994, the latter CH, May'94), the California editions of Huck Finn are a comparative bibliographic study in themselves. This definitive and richly detailed edition is "booming," which the book's glossary explains means "splendid, grand, superb." ^BSumming Up: Essential. All collections, all levels. D. E. Sloane University of New Haven

Copyright American Library Association, used with permission.
Review by Booklist Review

Gr. 7-10. Generations have enjoyed this robust, insightful story, which has been the basis for several movies, the Broadway musical Big River, and featured recently on public television.

From Booklist, Copyright (c) American Library Association. Used with permission.
Review by Library Journal Review

The Mark Twain Project used the second half of the original manuscript of Twain's masterwork (given by Twain to the Buffalo and Erie County Public Library), together with the first half from the first American edition of 1885, for its 1985 edition of the novel. In 1990, however, the first half of the original manuscript was found in the attic of the great-granddaughter of James Gluck, the curator of the Buffalo library. While the recovery of the first half of the manuscript (told in detail in "Note on the Text") is itself an interesting detective story, the upshot of the matter is that the present text represents the whole manuscript as Twain surely intended it before typesetters and proofreaders introduced the errors that we have been reading all these years. Most of those numerous errors are minor (misspellings and punctuation errors), but some are significant (three revised sections of the novel, for example). Few but Twain scholars will appreciate the meticulous editing that has gone into this volume, but those who care will be able to see more clearly than ever how carefully Twain revised the novel into its greatness. Highly recommended for all scholarly libraries. Charles C. Nash, Cottey Coll., Nevada, MO (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Review by School Library Journal Review

Gr 7 Up-Mark Twain's classic and much assigned novel of boyhood and interracial issues in the Antebellum South is skillfully read Dick Hill. While both Twain and Hill work to keep accents differentiating race, class, and locality clear and consistent, Hill doesn't always manage to adhere to the pitches he creates for individual characters who share gender and age. However, his pacing nicely suits the story and demonstrates its richness for young readers who are often put off by the spelling and locutions Twain employed to provide an accurate record of the time and place. The visual aspect of this package, however, may have difficulty finding a broad audience. Each page of text, illustrated with the Edward Kemble drawings that appeared in the book's original published form, appear onscreen as they are voiced. This leads to a static quality unlikely to engage today's visually sophisticated youth, while reducing the details of Kemble's work by placing it beyond the field of intimacy an individual holding the book can enjoy. Also, because this novel continues to receive criticism for its use of the "N" word, seeing and hearing it simultaneously may cause a some problems. Collection planning for the inclusion of this type of "visual" audiobook is suggested.-Francisca Goldsmith, Halifax Public Libraries, Nova Scotia, Canada (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Review by Horn Book Review

These adaptations are so poor that it is a disgrace for the original author's name to appear on the book; the old classic comic-book renditions had more integrity. (c) Copyright 2010. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright 2010. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Review by Kirkus Book Review

This slender graphic adaptation of the Great American Novel preserves some of Twain's language, most of his plot and a good sense of his sardonic take on human society. Mixing dialogue balloons with enough boxed narrative to evoke Huck's distinctive voice, Mann packs in all of the major incidents and tones down at least some of the violencethe two con men are only "punished" here rather than specifically tarred and feathered, for instance. Similarly, though Huck gets viciously slapped around by his father in the pictures, in general there isn't much other blood visible. The illustrator's faces tend toward sameness, but Kumar populates his color art with strong, stocky figures, depicts action effectively and, by using irregular frames and insets, sets up an engrossing helter-skelter pacing. A good choice for readers who aren't quite up to tackling the original, with perfunctory but well-meant notes on Twain's life and the history of slavery in the United States. Co-published with its prequel, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, adapted by Matt Josdal, illustrated by Brian Shearer (ISBN: 978-93-80028-34-7). (Graphic classic. 12-14)]] Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

Copyright (c) Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.