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Environmental activists /

Other Authors: Mongillo, John F., Booth, Bibi.
Format: Book
Language: English
Published: Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press, 2001
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Review by Choice Review

Two editors and 31 contributors (including one committee) have provided biographical sketches of varying length and quality concerning 84 environmental activists. Though not stated in the title, all but a few were American born, and primarily known for their activities in the US. The earliest subject is John James Audubon (1785-1851). Most (76 of the 84) began their careers after the year 1900. Some biographees are well known; the rest enjoy varying amounts of name recognition. In some instances (among them two teenage activists), subjects wrote their own biographical sketches in the third person. In the interests of greater objectivity, other contributors could have been found to do these entries. Photos of most subjects are provided. Bibliographies, often emphasizing electronic sources, are included for many, but not all, individuals. Citations for standard published biographies of some of the better-known subjects, as well as recent scholarly studies about their work, are often missing. Despite the unevenness of this work, it offers a broad look at 20th-century environmental activism, and some information on the younger activists is new. General readers; undergraduates. K. B. Sterling formerly, Pace University

Copyright American Library Association, used with permission.
Review by Booklist Review

This volume profiles more than 60 Americans who have worked to save the environment. Arrangement is alphabetical. Articles are generally three to five pages in length, and most are followed by a bibliography, often with Web sites. The editors admit that not everyone who has been involved in saving the earth has been included. They tried to provide a balance of historical and current, male and female subjects. Historical personages include those we associate with environmental issues--such as Audubon, Muir, and Theodore Roosevelt--as well as names better known in other fields--such as George Catlin (art) and Frederick Law Olmsted (landscape architecture). Among more contemporary activists are the familiar Roger Tory Peterson and Karen Silkwood and the less-familiar Nevada Dove, a youth organizer for Concerned Citizens of Los Angeles, and Catherine Sneed, director of the Garden Project in San Francisco. In some cases, profiles were written by the subjects themselves. Following the biographies is an "Environmental Timeline" that begins with colonial America and continues through the year 2000. When a person is mentioned on the time line and also appears in the text, the name appears in bold type. This feature puts environmental problems and the attempts to solve them in historical perspective. A table of contents would have been a useful addition, giving a snapshot of the volume's range. Although it is easy to find information on Edward Abbey and Rachel Carson, this volume is valuable for its inclusion of individuals who are less well known. The message to the reader is that these were ordinary people who cared enough about some environmental issue or some place to dedicate themselves to publicizing or preserving it. This book will be useful for the general reader as well as middle-and high-school students who need information for reports.

From Booklist, Copyright (c) American Library Association. Used with permission.
Review by Library Journal Review

Mongillo (Encyclopedia of Environmental Science) and Booth, an environmental specialist with the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, here provide profiles of 75 environmentalists dating from the early 1800s to the present. Familiar names like Thoreau, Audubon, and Muir (in the 19th century) and Rachel Carson, Ralph Nader, David Brower, and Aldo Leopold (in the 20th century) take their place beside the less familiar, e.g., Robert Bullard, Chellis Glendinning, and Juanita Beatriz Gutierrez, who are dedicated to achieving environmental equality for people of color. The most interesting profiles are of the "new activists" who involved themselves in environmental causes as teenagers, such as Ocean Robbins, Nevada Dove, and Maria Perez. At the other end of the spectrum are those who have worked tirelessly for decades, such as Ruth Patrick (aged 92), Hazel Wolf (101), and Marjory Stoneman Douglas (108). Averaging two to five pages in length, entries are contributed by members of environmental groups and are sometimes autobiographical; a bibliography and web sites are included when applicable. Finally, an environmental time line includes the events in which these activists participated. The lack of an introductory listing of activists is a minor irritation, and, as with all biographical information, one can quibble about inclusion and exclusion. Since much of this information can be found in other, more comprehensive sources e.g., Anne Becher's two-volume American Environmental Leaders (LJ 2/1/01), which covers more than 350 activist this work is recommended only for libraries that need additional environmental biographical resources. Eva Lautemann, Georgia Perimeter Coll., Clarkston(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Review by School Library Journal Review

Mongillo (Encyclopedia of Environmental Science) and Booth, an environmental specialist with the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, here provide profiles of 75 environmentalists dating from the early 1800s to the present. Familiar names like Thoreau, Audubon, and Muir (in the 19th century) and Rachel Carson, Ralph Nader, David Brower, and Aldo Leopold (in the 20th century) take their place beside the less familiar, e.g., Robert Bullard, Chellis Glendinning, and Juanita Beatriz Gutierrez, who are dedicated to achieving environmental equality for people of color. The most interesting profiles are of the "new activists" who involved themselves in environmental causes as teenagers, such as Ocean Robbins, Nevada Dove, and Maria Perez. At the other end of the spectrum are those who have worked tirelessly for decades, such as Ruth Patrick (aged 92), Hazel Wolf (101), and Marjory Stoneman Douglas (108). Averaging two to five pages in length, entries are contributed by members of environmental groups and are sometimes autobiographical; a bibliography and web sites are included when applicable. Finally, an environmental time line includes the events in which these activists participated. The lack of an introductory listing of activists is a minor irritation, and, as with all biographical information, one can quibble about inclusion and exclusion. Since much of this information can be found in other, more comprehensive sources e.g., Anne Becher's two-volume American Environmental Leaders (LJ 2/1/01), which covers more than 350 activist this work is recommended only for libraries that need additional environmental biographical resources. Eva Lautemann, Georgia Perimeter Coll., Clarkston (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.