Finding a copy of a cited newspaper or magazine article is a straightforward process in most cases. The citation or reference for the article should include all necessary information. Most citations come from books, journal articles, or web-based bibliographies. Occasionally a reference is verbally communicated in which case problems can arise from missing or distorted information. The Library will be able to furnish most newspaper and magazine articles either from its own collections or through interlibrary loan as long as the citation is correct.

footnote.jpg
Note taken from Tobias Hochscherf and Christoph Laucht, "Reenacting the First Battle of the Cold War,"
in Divided, But Not Disconnected: German Experiences of the Cold War, edited by Tobias Hochscherf,
Christoph Laucht, and Andrew Plowman, 190-203. New York: Berghahn Books, 2010.

For example, the footnote above references articles from two German newspapers. The newspapers are highlighted in yellow. Start with a newspaper title search in the Library's Journal and Article Finder database.

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We can see above that the Library has access to Die Süddeutsche Zeitung through Nexis Uni which includes the year in which the cited article was published. While the Library subscribes to few foreign language newspapers directly, some of the news aggregator databases that are part of the Library's collection, such as Nexis Uni, include a fair number of foreign news sources. Most newspapers that are part of Nexis Uni are not included in the Books & Media catalog and hence cannot be found with a "Journal title" search. Also important to note, the Books & Media catalog will not recognize newspaper abbreviations such as FAZ, short for Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung. The Library's Journal and Article Finder database is more forgiving in regard to abbreviated titles and will match up most abbreviations. Alas, the Library does not have access to the FAZ. Ask a librarian for assistance to establish the full name of a newspaper.

Alternatively, one can also start with an Article Title search using the search menu on the Library’s website. More detailed instructions follow below. Articles which are not available in the local collection, such as the one from the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung from June 26, 2008, can be requested through interlibrary loan. Expect to wait one to two days for electronic delivery. Or try your luck online. Many newspapers make some of their content freely available online. Peter Badenhop's article "Süße Freiheit am Himmel über Berlin" falls into this category.


Recommended Tools to Retrieve Cited Articles

Books & Media
Select Journal Title and search for the title of the cited newspaper or magazine. Link from the catalog record to the digital archive. Note that not all newspapers and magazines are electronically available. Some are only available in print or microfilm format. Newspapers and magazines that are part of aggregate archives such as America's Historical Newspapers and Nexis Uni are not always listed in the catalog.

Journal Finder
Finds newspapers and magazines that are locally available.

Articles & More Search
Select Article Title from the search menu and use quotation marks to limit results. This catalog only links to electronically available content. Local print and microfilm holdings are not listed. Useful search operators include:
- Exclude articles at other libraries
This operator is active in the default setting. Change the default to discover content outside the local collection. Use interlibrary loan services to request articles from other libraries.
- Format
Select News to narrow results to newspapers and magazines.

Databases A-Z
Presents the Library's databases in alphabetical order. Includes major newspaper archives such as the New York Times archive and collections of aggregated newspapers and magazines such as British Periodicals and American Indian Newspapers.

Interlibrary Loan Services
Request articles that are not available in the local collection through interlibrary loan. Enter citation information into the online request form. Electronic delivery generally takes one to two days.