Learn how to identify and read newspaper article citations, then search for those articles using the Search for an Article tool. 

You may need to search for a specific newspaper article if you:  

  • Have the article citation information but not the article itself  
  • Find the article through an internet search but cannot access it without a subscription  

Identifying Newspaper Article Citations 

To search for a specific article, you will need the citation information. Citation information generally includes the article author, title, publication title, and date of publication. If you are working with an article you located through an internet search, make a note of these elements.  

Newspaper article citations will look something like this:  

APA

Brody, J. E. (2007, December 11). Mental reserves keep brains agile. The New York Timeshttp://www.nytimes.com 

MLA  

Brubaker, Bill. "New Health Center Targets County's Uninsured Patients." Washington Post, 24 May 2007, p. LZ01. 

Chicago  

Mead, Rebecca. “The Prophet of Dystopia.” New Yorker, April 17, 2017. 

Pai, Tanya. “The Squishy, Sugary History of Peeps.” Vox, April 11, 2017.  http://www.vox.com/culture/2017/4/11/15209084/peeps-easter.  

Citations for newspaper articles may look a little different from other citations you are used to seeing. Newspaper article citations generally include a specific date (month, day, year), instead of simply providing the year of publication. You may also see strange page numbers, such as A1 or LZ01, instead of simple numeric numbers. Newspaper articles also do not have a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) that is included in many scholarly scientific publications. 

Search for aN article 

To search for a specific article, use the Search for an Article tool. 

  1. Open Journal Finder (also linked on the Falvey Library homepage). 

  1. Scroll down to the Search for an Article tool: 

  1. We will search for one of the citations listed above as an example: 

Brubaker, Bill. "New Health Center Targets County's Uninsured Patients." Washington Post, 24 May 2007, p. LZ01. 

  1. Using the citation information, fill in the fields in Search for an Article:  

 

 

 

 

Don't worry about leaving the DOI field empty, newspaper articles often do not include this element.  

  1. Once you have entered the relevant information, click the Search button.  
  2. You will be redirected to a page that will tell you if Falvey has access to the full text of the article online.  
  3. If Falvey does have access to full text, you will see a page that looks like this:  

  1. Click any of the Full Text Online links to open the full text of the article.  
  2. If Falvey does NOT have access to the full text of the article online, you will see a button that says Get a Scan:  

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  1. Click Get a Scan to request a scan of this article from another library. You will be redirected to Falvey's Inter-Library Loan portal to place your request. 

    1. A PDF copy of the article will delivered to you directly via email in approximately 2-5 business days. See Inter-Library Loan help for more information.
       

Note: If you are unable to locate your article using the article finder, you can try searching for the publication and navigating to the date of interest. Occasionally, articles are published under multiple titles in different editions of a paper. Feel free to contact a librarian for assistance with your sleuthing as well!